The Paris Attacks: The Latest


Updated on November 16 at 7:14 a.m. ET

What we know so far:

—An unnamed French official is telling The Associated Press that Friday’s deadly attacks in Paris were masterminded by Abdelhamid Abaaoud, a Belgian citizen believed to be in Syria. The official said Abaaoud was also behind the foiled attack on a French train in August.

— French prosecutors say one of the suicide bombers who carried out Friday’s attacks was Ahmed al-Mohammad, a Syrian passport holder who passed through the Greek island of Leros last month. Abaaoud was among two suicide bombers named Monday.   

— French police carried out more than 150 raids in Bobigny, Lyon, and Tolouse, Prime Minister Manuel Valls said.

—French warplanes struck Islamic State targets in Raqaa, the Syrian city that the militant group claims as its capital.

—The death toll in Friday’s attack stands at 129. More than 350 others were injured.


French investigators carried out more than 150 raids across the country, days after multiple attacks across Paris killed at least 129 people and wounded more than 350 others.

An unnamed French official told the AP that Friday’s attack was masterminded by Abdelhamid Abaaoud, a Belgian citizen believed to be in Syria. The official said Abaaoud was also behind the foiled attack on a French train in August.

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Over the weekend, the Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack, and President Francois Hollande vowed a “merciless” response. Overnight, French warplanes struck targets in Raqaa, the Syrian city that serves as the Islamic State’s de facto capital.

French officials identified a further two attackers on Monday:  Samy Amimour, a 28-year-old Frenchman charged in a terrorism investigation in 2012, blew himself up in the Bataclan music hall, the prosecutor’s office said. A suicide bomber who blew himself up near Stade de France, the national stadium, was identified by prosecutors as Ahmad Al Mohammad, 25. His fingerprints match those of someone who entered Europe through Greece last month, they said. Other attackers who have been identified are:  Salah Abdeslam, a 26-year-old from Belgium who is still at large; his brother Ibrahim, who detonated his suicide belt on the Boulevard Voltaire;  and Ismael Omar Mostefai, a 29-year-old Frenchman who was involved in the Bataclan attack. News media have identified an additional suspect as Bilal Hadfi, another of the stadium attackers.

The attacks are the worst violence on French soil since World War II, and the worst in Europe since 2004 when coordinated blasts on Madrid’s commuter train system killed 191 people. They also came 10 months after two Islamist gunmen killed 11 people at the offices of the Paris-based Charlie Hebdo, the French satirical magazine. Attacks around Paris that followed that massacre killed an additional five people.

France was already on high alert following those attacks when the events of Friday night unfolded. There were attacks on two restaurants in the 10th arrondissement (at least 12 dead in gun attacks) and two on restaurants in the 11th arrondissement (at least 24 dead). The national stadium, where France was playing Germany in a soccer match, was also attacked (at least three attackers dead), as was the Bataclan concert venue, which was packed with fans of Eagles of Death Metal, a rock band from California (at least 80 dead).   

French official say that in all 129 people were killed and more than 350 injured in the attacks. Investigators believe the attackers operated in three teams throughout the city.

On Saturday, Hollande called the attacks “an act of war … prepared and planned from the outside, with accomplices inside.” He declared three days of mourning for the victims of the attack.

On Monday, France stood still for a minute of silence for the victims of the attacks. Hundreds gathered at the Place de la Republique in Paris to honor the victims. The Guardian reports: “One man held up French flags, several people wept and buses at the busy intersection pulled over. At the end, the crowd burst into spontaneous applause.”

France also announced a series of security measures, including the declaration of a state of emergency and the indefinite closing of the Eiffel Tower and other tourist attractions.

French police carried out more than 150 raids in Bobigny, Lyon, and Tolouse, Prime Minister Manuel Valls said. Dozens were detained. Raids also continued in Belgium, which as my colleague Matt Ford reported “has been tied to several perpetrators of recent high-profile jihadist attacks in Belgium and France.”

Leaders of the world’s 20-biggest economies continued their meeting in Turkey, but much of the conversation was focused on attacks in Paris, the Islamic State, the Syrian civil war, and the migration crisis—issues that are now inextricably linked.

President Obama met Sunday with Russian President Vladimir Putin for 35 minutes on the sidelines of the G20 to discuss the Syrian crisis, but Yuri Ushakov, the Kremlin’s top foreign-policy adviser, said while the two leaders shared the “strategic goals regarding the fight against Islamic State … they still differ as far as tactics are concerned.”

We will be updating this story as we learn more.